Overview

Up to this point in photography producing a negative had been a tedious and drawn out process. To be a photographer quite literally called for a caravan worth of supplies, and a darkroom. Looking for a simpler and smaller product of a camera, Thomas Skaife devised a miniature camera that called for 3 by 1 inch slides. As a result one could produce very quick exposures, often utilizing a flash for indoor or night time. This led to term dubbed "candid photography" by Erick Salomon. This meant that a picture could be taken during it's motion, not just as a long, still exposure. Because of this, photographers were able to capture celebrities as well as every day citizens going about their daily routine, "candid" photographs.

Today the process has been perfected with quick lens flips and battery powered flashes, but began with powder explosions and hand clicked lenses.
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Thomas Skaife's pistol - camera

Andre Kertesz

In 1915 Andre Kertesz began taking sensitive un-posed photographs that captured his subjects amidst their natural surroundings. He also believed in capturing moments that would never be the same again, turning photography into an art form.

 Kertesz's Displaced People, 1916. Courtesy of: http://lacanciondelasirena.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/andre-kertesz_displaced_people.jpg
Kertesz's Displaced People, 1916. Courtesy of: http://lacanciondelasirena.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/andre-kertesz_displaced_people.jpg


Kertesz's Wandering Violinist, 1921. Courtesy of: http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/surrealist_art/kertesz/24.jpg
Kertesz's Wandering Violinist, 1921. Courtesy of: http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/surrealist_art/kertesz/24.jpg


Feeding the Ducks in the Late Afternoon, 1924. Courtesy of: http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/surrealist_art/kertesz/25.jpg
Feeding the Ducks in the Late Afternoon, 1924. Courtesy of: http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/surrealist_art/kertesz/25.jpg


Montmarte, 1927. Courtesy of http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/surrealist_art/kertesz/26.jpg
Montmarte, 1927. Courtesy of http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/surrealist_art/kertesz/26.jpg


Muedon, Paris 1926. Courtesy of: http://www.bbc.co.uk/photography/genius/gallery/images/kertesz.jpg
Muedon, Paris 1926. Courtesy of: http://www.bbc.co.uk/photography/genius/gallery/images/kertesz.jpg