Straight or “Pure” Photography is creating an image that objectively portrays the reality of the world; without manipulating the photograph after it has been produced. The Straight Photography movement was first publicized in the early 1900’s through a note by The New York Times on an exhibition in New York with photographs by Alvin Langdon Coburn, Gertrude Kasebier, Clarence H. White and many others. Advocates of this practice believed that by manipulating a picture after it had been taken, one loses the purity or tone which can be rooted directly to a unique photograph. Alfred Stieglitz was a pioneer in the process, although he often complemented photographers who’s photographs resembled paintings or drawings. The Straight photography process strived to encourage photographers to experiment with the limits of the camera and developing process to create abstract and unique photographs instead of manipulating the image with a brush after it had been printed. Some other artists who believed in the process of Straight or "Pure" Photography include: Edward Weston, Charles Sheeler, Paul Strand, Edward Steichen, and John Simon.






Charles Sheeler A Straight photographer and painter
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Edward Weston A classic transition into straight photograph, along with the creation of Group f/64
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